adhd sticker chart

Sticker Charts!

A great way to motivate your children to behave well and get their homework and chores done!

A visual reminder of chores and appropriate behaviors is critical for children just as many adults need a to-do list.

  1. Create a chart listing all chores and behaviors that your child should complete by the end of the day.
  2. Add stickers under each completed chore either at the end of the day or immediately following the chore. Let your child pick out the stickers in order to add to his/her excitement of receiving them.
  3. After a certain number of stickers are earned, reward your child!Many children love to earn the privilege of going to a store and choosing their own toy, for example. Other reward ideas include choosing a movie to watch, choosing a restaurant for dinner, or inviting over a friend each month. Make sure your child knows the rules and rewards for the sticker chart before starting so that he/she is motivated to behave well. Keep the chart somewhere your child can easily see it, such as on his/her bedroom door.Here is an example of a sticker chart for you to use as a model for your own:

adhd sticker chart
Contact Dr. Gordon for help with your ADHD. We have treatment and solutions available online, by phone, and in our offices.

written by:
 Brianna Malinowski, 
Jay Gordon, Ph.D

ADHD diagnosis

Why Punishment Doesn’t Work

People often assume that the reason for ADHD is lack of punishment. This can be very insulting for parents as it is assumed that their lack of discipline is to blame. However, lack of punishment does not cause ADHD and increased punishment does not improve ADHD.

ADHD is a factor of a child’s neurochemistry and physical brain. Just as someone who cannot hear well or see well should not be punished, those with ADHD should also not be punished. Anger and frustration result since punishment often leads to a coercive behavior cycle. This occurs when some authority (a parent, teacher, or boss) gives an order. When the person with ADHD does not listen to this order, the authority becomes angry and frustrated. The authority can either physically force the other person to complete the order or give up and ignore the order. This eventually causes more frustration for all people involved.

The key to dealing with ADHD is not punishment, but increased use of positive reinforcement, skills training and proper use of effective compensatory strategies. An ADD/ADHD coach can help develop and apply these strategies. In order to better cope with your or your loved one’s ADHD, contact Dr. Gordon.

Contact Dr. Gordon for help with your ADHD. We have treatment and solutions available online, by phone, and in our offices.

written by:
 Brianna Malinowski, 
Jay Gordon, Ph.D

Reynolds, C., Vannest, K., & Harrison, J. (2012). The Energetic Brain (pp. 28-30). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

ADHD diagnosis

Types of ADD/ADHD

ADD may have either a predominantly inattentive presentation, a predominantly hyperactive/impulsive presentation, or a combined presentation.

Inattention Symptoms:

  1. Makes careless mistakes in work; fails to give attention to details
  2. Difficulty paying attention during tasks
  3. Does not appear to listen when spoken to
  4. Does not follow instructions; fails to finish tasks
  5. Difficulty keeping things in order (including managing time)
  6. Avoids, dislikes, or hesitates to engage in tasks that demand extensive mental effort (writing essays, homework)
  7. Loses things needed for tasks (losing pencils, keys, glasses)
  8. Easily distracted (both by external events and unrelated thoughts)
  9. Forgetful (forgetting chores, bills, returning calls)

Hyperactivity/Impulsivity Symptoms:

  1. Fidgets with hands, taps feet, squirms in seat
  2. Leaves his/her seat often when sitting is expected
  3. Runs or climbs in inappropriate settings (or feeling restless in adults)
  4. Unable to remain quiet during activities
  5. Acts as if “driven by a motor”
  6. Talks excessively
  7. Answering before the question was finished or not waiting turn in conversation
  8. Difficulty waiting for turn
  9. Interrupts or intrudes on others

At least 6 (or 5 for those 17 and older) symptoms of inattention must be present for at least 6 months in order for ADD to be predominantly inattentive.

At least 6 (or 5 for those 17 and older) symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity must be present for at least 6 months in order for ADHD to be predominantly hyperactive/impulsive.

If enough symptoms from both categories are present, a combined presentation may exist.
Contact Dr. Gordon for help with your ADHD. We have treatment and solutions available online, by phone, and in our offices.

written by:
 Brianna Malinowski, 
Jay Gordon, Ph.D

Barlow, D., & Durand, V. (2015). Abnormal psychology: An integrative approach (7th ed., pp. 515-516). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

ADHD diagnosis

Parenting a Child with ADHD: The A³PC Method

Although, parenting a child with ADHD can be frustrating, techniques exist to help parents promote their child’s success. The A³ parent-child interactions technique focuses on providing affection, positive attention, and affirmation to help children cope with ADHD.

1. Affection
Children with ADHD typically receive negative attention from peers and adults, which makes it even more important for them to receive affection at home. It may be difficult to show affection when a child’s behavior is frustrating, but take notice of how often you are giving affection to your child and try to increase that number.

2. Positive Attention
Giving affection is part of giving positive attention, but more than affection must be shared with your child. Try to give 10 -20 minutes of undivided attention to your child with ADHD per day. During this time, have your child choose a game to play or allow him/her to simply talk to you. Developing a positive relationship with children allows them to develop higher self-esteem and confidence, which is important for children with ADHD.

3. Affirmation
Praise is essential to encourage good behavior. Saying phrases such as “good job,” is only a start to praising your child. More importantly, praise must target a specific behavior. In order to make sure your child knows exactly which behavior warrants praise, tell them specifically which behavior was good, what that behavior means, and the consequence of the good behavior. For example, “great job (praise) doing all your math homework (specific behavior), that is very responsible of you (meaning of behavior). Now you can understand the math lesson better tomorrow” (consequence of behavior). This kind of speaking may seem awkward at first, but an awkward start is worth promoting good behavior!

Contact Dr. Gordon for help with your ADHD. We have treatment and solutions available online, by phone, and in our offices.

written by:
 Brianna Malinowski, 
Jay Gordon, Ph.D

Reynolds, C., Vannest, K., & Harrison, J. (2012). The Energetic Brain (pp. 28-30). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

 

ADHD diagnosis

Strengths of Those with ADHD

Although, the word “disorder” has a strongly negative connotation, it is essential to keep in mind that those with ADHD do have strengths. Some behavioral characteristics of ADHD can actually help, rather than hinder, successful performance. Here are some strengths that those with ADHD often display:

Energy. When high energy is channeled in a proper direction, it can be a powerful source of work ethic and achievement. Energy gives people the motivation to begin new projects, create innovative ideas, and lead others. Ty Pennington, host of the former show Extreme Home Makeover, attributes his success to his highly creative energy due to ADHD.

Focus, passion, and exuberance. People with ADHD can experience long periods of “hyper-focus.”  This occurs when their high energy and passion leads to becoming completely engrossed in a certain interest. For example, you may notice that a child with ADHD is extremely involved with one activity, such as reading a book or playing chess. Interruption of this activity can lead to anger or irritability; however, such intense focus can be beneficial for completing tasks that demand attention.

Multitasking. Leadership positions often demand that a person be able to switch quickly from one task to another, which many with ADHD are able to do effectively. Those with ADHD are typically able to process lots of information quickly, which is beneficial in all areas of life.

Contact Dr. Gordon for help with your ADHD. We have treatment and solutions available online, by phone, and in our offices.

written by:
 Brianna Malinowski, 
Jay Gordon, Ph.D

Reynolds, C., Vannest, K., & Harrison, J. (2012). The Energetic Brain (pp. 28-30). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.